Intern Debate:  Australia should join China's Belt and Road initiativeTensions, contradictions and opportunities: Australia’s relationship with President Xi’s China 

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  • Belt and road forum

    Intern Debate: Australia should join China's Belt and Road initiative

    Date Tue, 25 Jun 2019
    Time 18:00 – 19:30
    Location The Glover Cottages, 124-134 Kent St, Millers Point NSW 2000

    China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), launched in 2013, is an ambitious plan to fund and construct new infrastructure and connectivity for international trade and investment. On the one hand, it is seen by some to represent a massive contribution by China to the public good, signalling its grand strategy to be a responsible global power. On the other hand, it is seen by some as a strategic geopolitical move to trap developing economies into debt relationships and exert Chinese state interests overseas. Over 100 countries and international organisations have signed BRI cooperation documents with China. Australia signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 2017. Our interns will debate whether or not Australia should join China's BRI, an increasingly important discussion in the Australian foreign affairs community, and one not to be missed. 

    On Tuesday, June 25, the interns from the AIIA NSW will debate the above motion.  

    The two teams will be:

    for the affirmative - Alex McManis, Hannah Green and Euan Moyle

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  • Australia china 540x307

    Tensions, contradictions and opportunities: Australia’s relationship with President Xi’s China 

    Date Tue, 02 Jul 2019
    Time 18:00 – 19:30
    Location The Glover Cottages, 124-134 Kent St, Millers Point NSW 2000

    China under President Xi is different from the China which Australia from Prime Ministers Whitlam to Turnbull envisioned. In 2019, China is a global power on the rise, more assertive and often aggressive; more powerful and more willing to use its power; less democratic and more authoritarian and less tolerant of dissent at home and abroad (including in Australia); and even more riddled with economic, political and social contradictions than in the past twenty years. It is also as entrepreneurial, creative and hard-working as it has been over centuries.  ​

    Australia in 2019 is also changing rapidly – its demography, economy and strategic outlook are in flux. So how will Australia shape its relationship with China, and how will China shape Australia, as both countries recalibrate their perceptions of each other amidst a historic geopolitical, economic and technological disruption?

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