Knowledge, Innovation and the New Cold WarMultilateralism and Australian interests: Where to next?

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  • Trump xi

    Knowledge, Innovation and the New Cold War

    Date Thu, 30 May 2019
    Time 18:00 – 19:00
    Location AIIA (ACT Branch)

    Some commentators are suggesting that the US-China Trade War is evolving towards a more radical goal: the “decoupling” of the American and Chinese economies. Using a range of legislative and administrative measures, the US government is actively reducing the interdependence of the Chinese and American economies. One of the key sites of such decoupling moves is in the knowledge and innovation sector. From the banning of Chinese tech companies to the exclusion of Chinese students from “sensitive” research areas, a new Cold War-like weaponisation of knowledge and innovation is upon us. Australia occupies a delicate place in the global knowledge and innovation ecology, and stands to lose more than most if the Cold War continues to escalate. This lecture will explore what the implications of these new developments may be for Australia, and suggests ways in which we should respond.

    Professor Michael Wesley is Professor of International Affairs and Dean of the College of Asia and the Pacific at the Australian National University. He has published on Australian foreign policy, Asia’s international relations and strategic affairs, and the politics of state-building interventions. His 2011 book, There Goes the Neighbourhood: Australia and the Rise of Asia,...

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  • Un geneva

    Multilateralism and Australian interests: Where to next?

    Date Tue, 11 Jun 2019
    Time 18:00 – 19:00
    Location AIIA (ACT Branch)

    The evolving rules-based global order, despite its patent imperfections, has generally served Australian interests well since WW2. The future of this order is now in doubt. What should Australia be doing in response? Both creative thinking and overcoming myths are now required to answer this question satisfactorily. Better expectation management of what multilateralism can realistically achieve would help. Multilateralism also needs to be seen as part of a suite of options which include regional, plurilateral and bilateral diplomacy. Our speaker will draw on his recent experience as Australia’s Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the United Nations in Geneva and Ambassador for Disarmament, including fields such as human rights, disarmament, migration and refugees, and health, but also casting the net wider.

    John Quinn retired in mid-2018 after more than 39 years in Australian diplomatic service. His last assignment was as Australia’s Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the United Nations in Geneva and Ambassador for Disarmament from 2014 to 2017. In that role, he was responsible for a broad range of multilateral issues, notably: human rights; arms...

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